Joint Statement by Trans-Pacific Partnership Ministers

July 31, 2015, Lahaina, HI – We, the trade ministers of Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, United States, and Vietnam announce that, after more than a week of productive meetings, we have made significant progress and will continue work on resolving a limited number of remaining issues, paving the way for the conclusion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations.

Ministers and negotiators leave Hawaii committed to build on the momentum of this meeting by staying in close contact as negotiators continue their intensive engagement to find common ground. Negotiators will also continue to work to formalize the achievements that have been made this week.

In this last stage of negotiations, we are more confident than ever that TPP is within reach and will support jobs and economic growth.

The progress made this week reflects our longstanding commitment to deliver an ambitious, comprehensive and high-standard TPP agreement that will support jobs and economic growth across the Asia Pacific region.

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)20150731-USTR Statement at WTO Trade Negotiations Committee

Unlocking Opportunity for Americans through trade with the Asia Pacific

President Obama’s trade agenda is dedicated to expanding economic opportunity for American workers, farmers, ranchers, and businesses. That’s why we are negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a 21st century trade agreement that will boost U.S. economic growth, support American jobs, and grow Made-in-America exports to some of the most dynamic and fastest growing countries in the world.

As the cornerstone of the Obama Administration’s economic policy in the Asia Pacific, the Trans-Pacific Partnership reflects the United States’ economic priorities and values. The TPP not only seeks to provide new and meaningful market access for American goods and services exports, but also set high-standard rules for trade, and address vital 21st-century issues within the global economy.

Here are a few of the ways the Trans-Pacific Partnership will unlock opportunity for you

The TPP will support Made-in-America exports

The TPP will make it easier to sell Made-in-America goods and services exports to some of the most dynamic and fastest growing markets in the world, and support homegrown jobs and economic growth.

The TPP will enforce fundamental labor rights

The TPP will level the playing field for American workers and businesses by building strong and enforceable labor standards.

The TPP will promote strong environmental protection

Environmental protection is a core American value. Through the TPP, the United States is negotiating for robust environment standards and commitments from member countries, and addressing some of the region’s most pressing environmental challenges.

The TPP will help American small businesses benefit from trade

American small businesses are the backbone of the U.S. economy, and have accounted for nearly two thirds of new private sector jobs in recent decades. The TPP will improve transparency and regulations to help U.S. companies engage in and benefit from increased trade in the Asia Pacific.

Unlocking Opportunity for America

The Trans-Pacific Partnership will grow trade with one of the world’s fastest growing regions, and share American values and commitment to improve labor practices and elevate environmental standards around the world.

The TPP will also have great benefits at home, for you and your community. Explore the below map to learn how the Trans-Pacific Partnership will benefit your state and industry, and help Made-in-America businesses grow and support local jobs through trade with the Asia Pacific Region.

USDA and NASA Expand Innovative Partnership to Better Predict Wildfires, Monitor Drought from Space

Updated Memorandum of Understanding strengthens research and data sharing, promotes STEM and agriculture to younger generations

July 16, 2015, MOFFETT FIELD, California–Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden and NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman today announced an expanded partnership between the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designed to better protect America’s working lands, predict and prevent natural disasters, and inspire young people to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and agriculture.

“Space is a unique laboratory that can be a gateway to solving some of the greatest agricultural challenges of our time,” says Deputy Secretary Harden. “This partnership is a powerful opportunity for USDA and NASA to yield new tools and techniques to help farmers and ranchers as they deal with the ongoing impacts of climate change and drought. Perhaps most importantly, this partnership will expose more young people to the power of science and innovation to solve some of the world’s most pressing challenges.”

“There are many areas where NASA and USDA have overlapping interests,” said NASA’s Deputy Administrator Dava Newman. “We can now better coordinate and build on the resources of both NASA and the USDA to help learn more about our planet’s vital resources and inspire the next generation to become better stewards of our planet.”

Among other things, the agreement will expand cooperation on space-borne remote sensing efforts to gather soil moisture data. One potential outcome of the expanded partnership between USDA and NASA could be using satellite data to create a series of soil moisture maps for California that could be used to improve weather and water availability forecasting and provide a drought early-warning system to producers, particularly in California.

Under the new agreement, USDA now has expanded access to data from NASA satellites that will help Forest Service fire fighters and first responders better detect wildfires and predict their behavior. USDA and the Department of the Interior have spent nearly $1.5 billion annually over the past decade on wildfire suppression, but this new technology has the potential to stop wildfires before they start, saving money, land, and even lives.

Deputy Secretary Harden and Deputy Administrator Newman at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) formalizing the expanded collaboration between USDA and NASA. As hunger and climate change are rapidly escalating threats to public health and national security, both NASA and USDA have a role to play in inspiring the next generation of students to pursue careers in STEM and agricultural fields.

Ames Research Center, one of ten NASA field enters, is located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley. For more than 75 years, Ames has led NASA in conducting world-class research and development in aeronautics, exploration technology and science aligned with the center’s core capabilities. The International Space Station (ISS), operated by NASA, includes a National Laboratory where ground-breaking scientific research is conducted every day. Currently, NASA has a mini veggie farm at the International Space Station to grow fresh produce like lettuce.

Since 2009, USDA has invested $4.32 billion in research and development grants. Studies have shown that every dollar invested in agricultural research now returns over $20 to our economy. In recent years, research by USDA scientists has led to discoveries of everything from a potential solution for millions who suffer allergies from peanuts to safe mosquito control that can help halt the transmission of diseases they spread, among others. For the latest on discoveries by USDA researchers, read the 2014 Annual Report on Technology Transfer.

20150716-USDA and NASA Expand Innovative Partnership to Better Predict Wildfires